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A Brain-Related Visual Problem May Affect More Children Than Thought

           A Brain-Related Visual Problem May Affect More Children Than Thought

 By Jim Windell

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What We Currently Know About ADHD

What We Currently Know About ADHD

By Jim Windell

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Early Life Experiences May be Passed Down to Children

Early Life Experiences May be Passed Down to Children

By Jim Windell

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Can Kids Benefit from Mindfulness Training?

Can Kids Benefit from Mindfulness Training?

By Jim Windell

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How Important is Self-Control?

How Important is Self-Control?

By Jim Windell

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Singing Eases Stress for Preterm Babies and Anxious Moms

Singing Eases Stress for Preterm Babies and Anxious Moms

By Jim Windell

            About one of every 10 infants born in the United States is premature – commonly referred to preemies. Babies who are born prior to the 37th month of pregnancy usually weigh much less than full-term babies and because they did not have enough time in the womb to develop they are often beset by various health problems – breathing difficulties, feeding problems, hearing and vision problems and other developmental delays.

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What’s so Bad about Teenage Depression?

What’s so Bad about Teenage Depression?

 By Jim Windell

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Subdural Bleeding in Infants is Proof of Abuse, Right?

Subdural Bleeding in Infants is Proof of Abuse, Right?

By Jim Windell

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Does Writing by Hand Make You Smarter?

Does Writing by Hand Make You Smarter?

By Jim Windell

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Recognizing Emotional and Psychological Symptoms in Children and Teens Following a Concussion

Recognizing Emotional and Psychological Symptoms in Children and Teens Following a Concussion

 By Jim Windell

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The Impact of Father-Child Play

Almost 15 years ago, Kevin O’Shea, a stay-at-home dad with three children, and I wrote the book “The Father-Style Advantage.” A main theme of the book was that dads have a much different parenting style than moms and this difference is very beneficial to children. One of the distinctions between mothers and fathers, we noted, was in the way that dads play with their children. We wrote that the rough and tumble style of play actually helps children, particularly boys, learn emotional control.

It turns out that an article in Developmental Review coming out in September, 2020, confirms what Kevin and I wrote all those years ago. The article, entitled “Father-Child play: A Systematic Review of its Frequency, Characteristics and Potential Impact on Children’s Development," is a meta-analysis of nearly 80 articles that look at what the research says about the frequency and characteristics of father-child play and the influence of play with dads on children’s development.

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Black Children Misperceived

We know from previous research that white police officers (and other white adults) tend to view Black adolescents and adults as more dangerous and threatening than white teens and adults. Now, there is new research that suggests that prospective teachers may also misperceive Black children.

The findings of a new study was published online in Emotion, an American Psychological Association journal.

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How to Ease Conflicts with Your Teen

It’s inevitable, isn’t it? You will have conflict with your adolescent at some time or another.

After all, they are becoming autonomous and independent; they won’t always agree with you or want to do things your way.

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What will be the effect of Stress from the Pandemic on Children?

There’s no doubt about it. The pandemic, stretching into five months as I write this, is having an effect on adults. In his novel, “The Plague,” Albert Camus wrote about people in a fictional town shuffling numbly through life as the epidemic reached a year. We haven’t quite reached that point in America, but as the Covid-19 pandemic shows no signs of abating, tensions and anxieties for many people are increasing.

That is certainly true of parents – what with moms and dads trying to juggle children and child care, work and schooling. A recent American Psychological Association (APA) survey found that nearly of parents with children under the age of 18 say their stress levels are high. As times moves on, a greater proportion of Americans say that the economy and work is a significant source of stress for them.  

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